Why Tranexamic Acid is the new buzzword in beauty.

Why Tranexamic Acid is the new buzzword in beauty.

By Elise Parkes

Why Tranexamic Acid is the new buzzword in beauty.

Glycolic. Hyaluronic. Salicylic. Whatever your poison, acids are now pretty much an essential in the skincare routine of the modern woman. Because who doesn’t want glowy, healthy and smooth skin, am I right? That being said, there’s a new kid on the block who goes by Tranexamic Acid and is so fabulous it’s turning the heads of even the most loyal skintellectual. But what is tranexamic acid, who should be using it and what are the benefits? 

What is tranexamic acid for skin? 

A skin-boosting superstar, tranexamic acid is a powerful skincare ingredient recognised for its ability to brighten skin complexion and improve the appearance of unwanted discolouration. 

Essentially, it's heaven-sent for anyone dealing with melasma, hyperpigmentation, acne scarring or dullness and we’re betting on it being the next big thing in addressing unwanted discolouration. 

Its powerful skincare benefits were actually discovered by accident, as tranexamic acid was originally used to reduce blood loss in patients experiencing heavy bleeding during open-heart surgery. However, physicians began noticing that the patients treated with tranexamic acid were starting to look preeeetty radiant, with a decrease in skin discolouration. Hence, the next biggest and glowiest ingredient in beauty was born.

What are the benefits of tranexamic acid? 

Having already shown huge popularity in Japan and South Asia, we’re really singing its praises but what does tranexamic acid in skincare actually do?  Research shows benefits of tranexamic acid include: 

  • Reduced inflammation
  • Soothed skin
  • An improvement in melasma discolouration  
  • Improved look of skin pigmentation 
  • Skin brightening 
  • A smoother skin texture
  • Reduced discolouration 
  • Reduced sensitivity to UV 

Sounds pretty amazing, doesn’t it…? 

Essentially for those of us with skin concerns such as hyperpigmentation, dullness, scarring, redness, unwanted texture and even melasma, this incredibly powerful ingredient has the ability to brighten your complexion and improve the appearance of discolouration. 

It’s these perks of tranexamic acid that boost the benefits of our new Peach & Glow hydra skin tonic, making it the answer to your pigmentation prayers. Uniquely formulated with, yes you guessed it, tranexamic acid and blended with Matrixyl 3000 and Bakuchiol to soothe skin and really address those pesky pigmentation problems. Plus, tranexamic acid pairs perfectly with other brightening and repairing formulas, like vitamin C and SPF, making it an easy addition to your skincare routine. 

Can tranexamic acid help with melasma? 

As we mentioned above, tranexamic acid is one of the newest progressions in improving the appearance of melasma.  As the summer months bring a little heat (we hope), that shining sun can also bring discolouration in the form of a smattering of brown patches known as melasma. Increasingly common in women as they enter their 30’s, this form of hyperpigmentation tends to appear dappled across cheeks and foreheads, as well as around the eye and lip area. More often than not, this is due to UV exposure, but can also be caused by a change in oestrogen levels (e.g. during pregnancy) or simply down to genetics. 

Okay, bear with us, because this is where we get a bit science-y. Tranexamic acid inhibits the activation of melanocytes (the melanin producing cells). This is important, because without treatment, at the sites of these dark melasma spots, the activated melanocytes would usually continue to produce melanin, even when not subjected to ultraviolet rays. Therefore, these dark spots remain or get worse. You still with us? Good. So, because of this, the sites of the dark spots are in a continuous state of mild inflammation and melanocytes (melanin) continue to be activated.  Basically, this means that the discolouration remains and can be quite difficult to get rid of, even if you reduce your sun exposure dramatically. 

So, how can tranexamic acid help with melasma? Well, research shows that tranexamic acid works to reduce this inflammation therefore decreases the levels pigmentation. Undertaking powerful and specific anti-inflammatory action, it inhibits the synthesis in melanocytes and at the same time blocks the transfer of pigment from melanocytes to the epidermis. Basically, for those of us who aren’t science wizzes, it prevents further hyperpigmentation and also reduces the usually continuous inflammation that causes existing melasma pigmentation to remain. 

Therefore, although there currently isn’t an 100% guaranteed cure for melasma, with the magic (and science) of tranexamic acid things are starting to look a whole lot brighter… 

 Check out Peach & Glow here!